ffwd – provençal vegetable soup

As one of our French Fridays recipes for the month of July, the conversation around this has been as much about the weather as anything else. Since I’d already been behind on recipes this month, I felt bad for not completing this one, so I went out and picked up the remaining ingredients I’d need. On my way home from my last appointment of the day, the temperature registered at 117 degrees! I talked myself into making some soup, reasoning that in Mexico and Southeast Asia, they often heat hot & spicy foods to keep cool…

This soup is a layering of flavors and textures, with each ingredient added based on amount of simmering required or where the flavor note should come in. I tried to keep myself to a half-recipe as I’ve found that soups in AMFT produce a bit more than expected.

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This starts with some olive oil and chopped onions, cooked until soft. Then some chopped garlic is added for a quick sauté.

Once that’s complete, some herbs are added – in this instance some thyme, rosemary and fresh oregano. Then layering over that: vegetable stock and carrots; mini potatoes (of course you can use chunks, but these multi-colored mini ones were irresistible). Pasta rounds out the longer-cooking ingredients.

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Next, come green beans. The recipe calls for canned cannellini beans as well, which I did not add this time. Then finally, the zucchini,  tomatoes and non-traditionally, fresh corn.

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While all of this simmering is happening, a fresh basil pesto is created for the iconic topping. It’s actually pistou in French, hence its real name soupe du pistou. I only had Thai and cinnamon basil available, but it still turned out nicely, and I didn’t think that it would matter. Maybe even add a bit of underlying flavor.

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For serving, all that’s required is a dollop of pesto, a drizzle of olive oil and a few basil leaves.

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I served mine with a nice white wine and some crusty French bread. Nothing more was needed. I have to say, this soup was divine! Easily the best “vegetable soup” I’ve ever had. I’m oh, so happy that I ignored the thermometer and made this. This is an absolute keeper, and one I’ll make again for sure.

If you’d like to see what the other Dorista’s thought, you can check out their posts here.

 

ffwd – coddled eggs with foie gras

Let me just start by apologizing to the extremely talented Doristas who chose our recipes this month. So far I’m 0 for 3 in on-time posts, and only 1 for 3 altogether – I might end up batting .250 if things hold up (and I’m allowed to count my late post). Not too bad for baseball, but pretty poor for blogging with the group. Vacation season and my new job have collided to make this a tricky month – oh, and throw in a requirement for some squash blossoms! I am not growing any zucchini this year, so nix that.

I was able to manage this recipe this week, albeit late. The trick was more in procuring the pâté foie gras, more than the method. Surprisingly only one choice was available at my fancy market, but it worked out. Otherwise, cream, eggs, parsley and a bit of tarragon, and a steamer.

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Bits of the foie gras are placed in the bottom of a buttered ramekin. Then the egg over the top, cream, salt and pepper, and your herbs. I did use a bit of Mexican tarragon, though I really must have an aversion to tarragon, as I could definitely taste it. Alas, I forgot to bring my truffle salt with me – I’m sure it would have been better that way! (I couldn’t decide which vessel I liked better, so I used different ones)

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These get placed in a steamer – I used my Chinese bamboo one, which was the perfect size.

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One thing that I didn’t really take into account was that the different dishes allowed the eggs to cook in different times. The recipe calls for 5 minutes, one was ready then, one took another minute or so. I served these with some homemade peach-blueberry muffins, though I have to admit, toast fingers as suggested would have been quite nice.

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This was good-ish, though will probably be a one-time thing. After all of the extravagant description, it didn’t really match up – though in all fairness, I didn’t have the truffles. We did, however enjoy the leftover pâté alongside another recipe of the salmon rillettes with some crisp white wine for dinner, so all was not lost!

If you’d like to see how others created this dish, you can look for them here.

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CCC – It’s June! tomatoes, potatoes, eggs and herbs

I thought that with my busy June schedule, I’d pick recipes that were related somehow. With a common thread connecting them. I do that all the time with dinner parties and celebratory feasts – if there’s something that provides a degree or two of separation to other items on the menu, then you can be sure everything will come together harmoniously.

Um, that seemed like a great idea, and also a way to take advantage of some of the ingredients included in the recipes. What I didn’t really take into account is that I don’t always eat the same things/ingredients. Thankfully, all of the recipes were terrific, but I may not need to eat a potato for a while…

First up, I made the pizza with potatoes, rosemary and blue cheese. I already had the dough for the pizza in the freezer, and was anxious to see how it turned out after freezing, as well as how it would work if I actually did take the advice of rolling it very thinly. I had rosemary from the garden, so this was easy. The main time-consuming thing was making the caramelized onions. I should probably do a big batch and freeze them, I just forget.

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Luckily I had a reasonably not-so-hot day, so that I could heat my oven up to cook the pizza. There might not be too many more of these for a bit, but everything came together with the pizza sliding from the peel to the stone satisfyingly, and the whole thing getting tasty and bubbly in no time.

100_3403On the same day, I decided I should make the honey-roasted cherry tomatoes. I thought that they would be nice to accompany the pizza. I’ve made similar recipes before, but the honey-garlic sweet-savory topping sounded great. After assembly, they get a quick roast.

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I served both together, and it was a great combination. The tomatoes contrasted with and complimented the flavors of the pizza.

100_3410Another recipe for this month was the frittata with summer veg and goat cheese. The recipe suggests a few vegetables, and certainly the method. This is another that relies on potatoes, eggs and herbs. Fortunately, I brought back a bunch from my place in Sedona, so was able to enjoy those fresh flavors. What I did not have were a lot of green vegetables, I decided to just rely on some peas, and a few more of my leftover roasted tomatoes. I subbed out some red onions for scallions, and added some fresh yellow peppers to add a bit more color. I used fresh thyme and oregano, along with a few chives.

100_3431The vegetables get sautéed in a bit of olive oil, based on the amount of cooking required, then arranged in the pan with the herbs. The beaten eggs go on top, and cook until about 2/3 set, topped with the cheese, and popped into the oven for a few minutes to set.

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Once out of the oven, the frittata sits for a few minutes, and indeed can be cooled to room temperature for serving. In this case, I was hungry… so the first piece was served hot!

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My final recipe for June was the new potato, tomato and boiled egg salad. This is an arrangement of those ingredients, generally room temperature, mixed with a mustardy vinaigrette. The trick here is to not-quite hard boil the eggs (7-minute eggs!), and smash them a bit with the dressing.

100_3441100_3443100_3444100_3448This is something that I would definitely make again, though I might tweak the dressing a bit. I don’t even know what “English mustard” is, but used traditional American yellow. ?? But I thought it might be improved with a pickle-ish element, either my home-made ones, or some capers. But really, and excellent concept. It was delicious, fast and filling, so it was a perfect lunch. I could see this for dinner too.

Altogether, these were delicious recipes this month. I really liked every one of them, though I could see a tweak here or there – but even as presented, they suited me. I learned a few new things along the way, and was reminded of a few more. A delicious experiment!

I can hardly wait to see what recipes July brings! If you’d like to see what other participants in the Cottage Cooking Club made, you can check them out online.

 

 

 

 

ffwd – guacamole!

This version of guacamole is a crunchy, veggie-filled mixture. There are so many ways to make guacamole, that it’s fun to try something different. I’ve always loved avocados (plainly sliced with a nice sprinkling of salt – yum), and guacamole, for me, is not an exception. I’m always surprised to find people who don’t like them, but I suppose that leaves more for me! (can you tell I’m from a large family?)

I used plenty of fresh diced jalapeno (and could have used more, mine was mild), diced cherry tomato, red onion and red bell pepper. I also included the chopped cilantro and added a little minced garlic.

100_3450Once that’s mixed, the soft avocado is added along with a bit of lime juice and a sprinkling of salt. I should have added some picante sauce here as well, since my jalapenos weren’t spicy.

100_3452Classically, this is served with fresh tortilla chips, though any kind are good. This version would be great topping a salad or on a sandwich as well.

100_3456This was pretty good. I did like the crunch, though it required quite a bit of hot sauce on the top. But refreshing and simple, and a different take from what I might normally throw together.

You can see how others prepared their guacamole by checking out their posts here.

ffwd – skate (tilapia) with capers, cornichons and brown butter sauce

I’ve never eaten skate before, though I’ve seen it on a few menus, mainly in coastal cities. To be honest, I still haven’t. While we can get a surprising variety of fin fish and shell fish at the better markets in the desert southwest of the US, skate isn’t one of them. So when I looked up alternatives, I got – tilapia. Mind you, I’ve seen pictures of skate, with their delicate color and ruffly edges, but not this time! I was sorry to have to substitute.

Otherwise, this is fairly straightforward. I like this kind of recipe because it reminds me that I really should fix fish at home more often. It’s easy, quick… this recipe is no different. Other than the fish, the ingredients are a little butter & flour, sherry vinegar, capers and cornichons, something I now have in my refrigerator thanks to FFWD.

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This is a quick pan-saute of the fish fillets that have been dredged in a light coating of seasoned flour. The fillets get cooked until lightly browned, just a few minutes.

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These can be set aside or kept in a warm oven. The pan is quickly wiped out, butter added and browned. The sherry vinegar is poured into the pan and quickly reduces, and then the remaining sauce ingredients are incorporated.

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The dish is assembled by placing the fish on top of a “pillow” of something soft, like mashed potatoes or celery root. I went with potatoes here, but I can see other whipped vegetables as a nice, light alternative. Finally, the fish is sauced, and served.

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I thought this was quite good, and loved the brown butter combined with the sharp vinegary elements of capers and mustard. I liked the cornichons well enough, but would agree that they were not really necessary with the capers already in the dish, plus it was a different kind of texture. All in all, quite a successful dish, that I should remember to make again, or at least a version.

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And finally, Dorie suggests to “forget about” leftovers. Well, I had some, and it was pretty tasty. Hardly party fare, but certainly tasty enough on a busy night.

If you’d like to see what others came up with, you can find their links here.

ffwd – avocado-crab ravioli

This is a combination of flavors that I think is fabulous. And while I thought that the method would likely get a little fussy, this preparation seemed like a fun idea. This is really a simple crab salad layered between thinly sliced avocado. The trick is how the chef that showed Dorie to make it using a mandoline to slice the avocados thinly, with the skin and pits in place. It sounded worth the try. I used king crab for mine, since I was making a smaller amount, along with some diced red onion, cilantro, chile oil and some lime.

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I made the salad first, then tried my hand at using my fancy French slicer with the avocados.

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My avocados were pefectly ripe, so not surprisingly, after the first couple of slices, the pit moved within the fruit, and the skin caught on the slicer. I also thought it was not as easy to remove the skin from the avocado. As you can see, it left a lot of the avocado as “shrapnel”. Which would be a crime if not taken care of.

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After assembling the ravioli, I chunked up the remainder of the avocado and added it to the crab salad. This I placed on some tostaditos (small fried corn tortillas). Both were good, though I wish I had added some hot sauce to either salad (but particularly the tostada version), because that really accentuates the flavors of the smooth avocado and salty-sweet of the crab. In very non-French fashion, these were served with some Mexican beer with lime, and of course a little hot sauce.

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The ravioli were fun, and I can see how it’s a popular dish. Personally, I don’t know that I’d make it again, but the flavor combination is terrific, so I’d be more likely to make my tostadas. They could be made smaller to serve as an appetizer too, which would be fun, but all in all, a fun experiment!

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ffwd – salmon rillettes

As I looked through this recipe, and did a little research, I decided that I would veer slightly off-path with my salmon, but loved the description of Dorie’s poaching method, so wanted to keep that.

This is essentially a rough spread combining poached salmon and smoked salmon. I’ve written before about my tightly held opinions about salmon. I really did go salmon fishing every year for a while, and often smoked salmon at home with the fish we brought back (I really need to find those pictures!!). I like the drier “hot-smoked” salmon much more than the lox versions. There’s a bit more texture, and I think flavor, since it’s brined prior to smoking. So for mine, I chose coho salmon for the fresh, and a smoked Scottish salmon (farmed) that were the relatively less-expensive version of the choices at WF, though all of the flavored smoked choices (now that I’ve made the recipe), would likely be terrific here too.

The salmon is poached in a spiced, winey broth for just a minute after the broth itself is allowed to simmer to develop flavors. I ended up using some fresh cayenne chile pepper and substituted some Chinese cooking wine for the white, since I didn’t have any open. The other ingredients are simple to set up.IMG_2484photo 1

As noted, the fresh salmon only poaches for about a minute. I liked the idea of the salmon cubes, since it seemed that they would really take on the flavors in the broth.

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This salmon gets drained, then combined with the smoked salmon, mashing a bit to create a spreadable consistency, but not so much that they texture is lost. One concern I had was that the smoked salmon might be too chunky, based on what I’d read, but it seemed to be soft enough for this dish.

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Once the salmon is the correct consistency, the other ingredients are added along with lemon, salt and white pepper. Seasoning more after tasting. I ended up adding some “Sunny Spain” seasoning from Penzey’s – and actually quite a bit of it. It has a little garlic as well as the lemon and pepper. I thought it needed it to make it flavorful.

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This gets packed into canning jars (and a little go-container for my lunch Monday). The rillettes are chilled for at least 2 hours to make the butter firm up and have all of the flavors meld. Unlike other versions, Dorie has us press plastic wrap to the surface, while other recipes add a layer of clarified butter on top to seal the jar.

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(Sometimes things go awry, I forgot this when I left for Sedona today, so should have been enjoying this in the garden with a nice glass of wine. I did really love this (and no, it won’t go to waste), and will definitely make this again.)

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